Review of “Roar: How to Match Your Food and Fitness to Your Unique Female Physiology for Optimum Performance, Great Health, and a Strong, Lean Body for Life” by Stacy Sims and Selene Yeager

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I first heard about this book through the Another Mother Runner podcast several months ago but I only recently borrowed it from the library. Why the long wait? Honestly, I just didn’t really think it could be that good. I’ve read other books written by female athletes, although not a ton, but I just wasn’t that inspired by them. They weren’t bad, but they weren’t anything special either.

“Roar” is not only a book for female runners but for female athletes in general and I can honestly say it’s one of the best books for women that I’ve read. Dr. Sims is not only a nutrition scientist and exercise physiologist but also an athlete herself. One quote I really like from the book is “You are not a small man. Stop eating and training like one.” This sums up the book well.

There are 17 chapters in “Roar,” covering everything from pregnancy to menopause to the female digestive tract, although there is some redundancy in places, but I found the book to be laid out well and easy to follow. “Roar” is filled with scientific information and while I’m a scientist and may be a bit biased, I thought it wasn’t too scientific for most non-scientists to follow. I also liked the “Roar Sound Bites,” brief summaries at the end of each chapter.

Not only does Dr. Sims lay it all out there for women by explaining how hormones effect athletic performance, she gives advice on how to control hormonal effects on our bodies. For example, women should take in protein high in leucine before exercise and within 30 minutes of  exercising to help maintain muscle when hormone levels are high. One thing I learned about myself is I need to be consuming even more protein than I previously thought. Dr. Sims recommends 1 gram of protein per pound per day for athletic women (this is much more than is recommended for non-athletic women).

Dr. Sims also has examples of daily diets for athletes of all kinds including triathletes, cyclists, and runners. She sometimes will give comparisons of their current diet vs. what Dr. Sims recommends they eat. There are also exercises with photos that take up two chapters of the book that she recommends for female athletes. A not-so-fun fact is that women who don’t strength train lose at least 3% muscle mass per decade after age 30.

There are also of course large chunks of the books devoted to diets, sports-specific fueling, and hydration. In addition to specific examples of recommended daily diets for athletes, there are recipes for snacks. Not surprisingly, women’s hydration needs are different from men’s because of hormones. One interesting tidbit is that Dr. Sims partnered with nuun hydration to help re-formulate nuun performance hydration powder in 2016; the partnership was announced shortly after “Roar” hit the publication stands but there are no references to any of this in the book.

There are also sections on how women can deal with extreme temperatures and high elevation including specific ways to cope and a section on recovery after a hard workout. One interesting point is that when men take an ice bath, they can start shivering and get microspasms in their already-fatigued muscles, which leads to more soreness and stalled recovery. Women, however, need help speeding up vasoconstriction after a hard workout, so women can still benefit from ice baths.

The chapter on supplements was interesting to me because it’s part of what my field of study has included for my job. Many women may be surprised to read that the only recommended supplements mentioned in the book include iron, vitamin D, and magnesium. Calcium and antioxidants such as vitamin C are not recommended and in fact can be harmful. Dr. Sims’ opinion on supplements is in agreement with what I’ve also read from other scientists but this information doesn’t seem to have trickled down to the mainstream yet.

Finally, the last couple of chapters are about how men’s and women’s brains are different and how we can use this information. For example, women tend to have a greater ability for social interaction so we would benefit from things like group runs or cycling sessions. Also, positive thinking and mindfulness can be especially important for women who often need help in these areas. The final chapter is about biohacking (looking inside your physiology) and discusses everything from pee sticks to blood testing to the simple but often overlooked question, “How do I feel?”

As I said earlier, I feel like “Roar” is one of the best books geared towards female athletes that I’ve read, and I do recommend picking up a copy. I read a review on Amazon that this book isn’t for the average athlete, but is more for elite athletes, and I disagree. I’m by no means an elite athlete and there was plenty I could take away from this book. OK, now I need to go eat more protein!

Have any of you read “Roar?” If so, what did you think? Are any of you intrigued about the book now and would like to check it out? You can see if you public library has it or Amazon has it for sale here.

Happy running!

Donna

 

 

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Running a Women-Only Race

It seems that women-only races are becoming more and more popular and for good reason. For many years women weren’t allowed to run long distances races. To even be typing that seems absurd to me but I remember when doctors would tell women they shouldn’t run. Going on absolutely no real findings, doctors believed running was somehow bad for women and/or that women couldn’t run long distances because we were too frail and our periods somehow interfered with running. If you even attempted to run while pregnant, you would be condemned by everyone you knew.

Flash back to 1967 when Kathrine Switzer became the first woman to run in the Boston Marathon with a numbered entry. She registered under the name “K.V. Switzer” and was almost thrown off the course while running by race official Jock Semple. Kathrine is a legend in the field of running and an inspiration to all runners but especially female runners. It took another five years before women were officially allowed to run in the Boston Marathon in 1972.

The field of female runners has increased over the years and gradually more and more women have been entering races but women are still out-numbered by men at most marathons. So why the draw to a women-only race? Well, I can tell you my first-hand experience. I ran a women-only plus “one lucky guy” half marathon in Massachusetts a few years ago. The race organizers allowed entry for one guy (I’m not sure how he was chosen from the other males that entered or even how many males entered for that matter).

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Some of the fall foliage from the All Women and One Lucky Guy Half Marathon

The All Women and One Lucky Guy Half Marathon I ran in Massachusetts was one that sticks out in my mind, of all of the half marathons I’ve run. Yes, the course was beautiful with all of the fall foliage in peak season and running past farms along country roads was lovely but that’s not what makes the race memorable. The race stands out in my mind apart from the rest because of the camaraderie at the race simply because it was an all-women race. It’s difficult to explain but it had a different kind of vibe than the usual male/female mixed races. You can read my full race report here.

I know there has been some backlash from some women’s only races, namely some of the Diva races, which include the half marathon and 5K in many cities in the US, Puerto Rico, and Canada. These races are all about the stereotypical feminine bling like pink boas, tiaras, tutus, and pretty much all things pink. I think it’s all meant to provide a fun atmosphere and shouldn’t be taken too seriously. Personally, I’m not a diva in any way, shape, or form, but I feel if some women want to be, that should be their choice. I have a friend who has run in some of the diva races and she said they’re “kind of silly” but also “kind of fun.” I say if it takes that kind of thing to encourage some women to run a race, so be it.

One important note, not all women’s only races are like the diva ones or the ones you hear about firefighters handing out jewelry to finishers at the end. The race I ran wasn’t handing out chocolates, roses, or anything frilly. The medal did have a pink ribbon but it wasn’t anything too over the top. In general this race was like any other race, except it happened to be all women and one guy running the race, and like I said earlier, there was a different kind of vibe.

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Women in the All Women and One Lucky Guy at the start- not much pink here!

Finally, my thoughts on men running in women’s only races. While these races are geared toward women and providing a safe, encouraging space, sometimes men will sign up. Sometimes their wife/girlfriend/friend/sister will ask them to run the race with them, and sometimes they just want to sign up and run it on their own, although I think both cases are pretty rare. There’s nothing to stop them. I don’t think we would ever have a role reversal like the Kathrine Switzer attempt to throw a man off a women’s only course. I think most men understand that women enjoy having their own space to run a race and they’re fine with that.

Want to try your own Women’s Only race? Here are a few to try:

See Jane Run Women’s Half Marathon & 5K – San Francisco Bay Area

Her Madison Half Marathon & 5K- Wisconsin

Bridge of the Goddess Half Marathon & 10K- Oregon

Queen Bee Half Marathon & 4-Miler- Cincinnati, Ohio

Unleash the She 5K & 10K- Minnesota

Phoenix Women’s Half Marathon, 5K, & 10K- Arizona

Cocoa Half Marathon, 5K, 10K, & 1 Mile Family Fun Run- San Antonio, Texas

Savannah Women’s Half Marathon & 5K- Georgia

Thelma and Louise Half Marathon & Relay- Utah

National Women’s Half Marathon & 8K- Washington, DC

Disney Princess Half Marathon, 10K, & 5K- Florida

Tinker Bell Half Marathon- California

Shape Women’s Half Marathon- New York City

Diva Running Series- multiple locations

How many of you have run in a women-only race? Any you’d recommend? Please share your experience here. Do you hate the very idea of women’s only races? Share those opinions as well!

Happy running!

Donna

 

 

Running During My Off-Season

I’m in-between half marathons currently, which means I haven’t been doing a whole lot of running. That doesn’t mean I haven’t been active, though. My last half marathon was in New Jersey and was my 40th state. Given that my next half marathon isn’t until November, that leaves a big chunk of the summer with no training plan. I’ll start training for my next race in a couple of weeks.

Now that I’m down to the final 10 states on my quest for a half marathon in all 50 states, I’ve gone from running a race every season to a race in three out of four seasons. After my race in November, I won’t have another race until May, which means my off-season will be during the winter months for the most part. Last year, I was training during the winter for my race in Utah in February. I was cursing my decision when I had to run my long runs in the cold last January and February, but I’m sure next summer when I’m training for a half marathon in August and have to do my long runs in the heat and humidity I’ll be cursing my decision to do a summer race.  Oh well!

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Although I haven’t been running a ton, I’ve been having fun biking with my family- here’s my daughter on a recent family ride

OK.  Back to my point, which is it’s kind of different having such a long break off of serious miles. Sure, I’ve still been running here and there, but the longest run I’ve gone on since the race in May is 4 miles. I’ll run 5 miles this weekend, but still, this is what many of you runners are doing for your mid-week runs. I’ve been working on strength training and some other things as well during this time off of race training, so it’s been a good time to do some other things like High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT), which I’ll ease off of when I’m in the double digits for my long runs.

There’s also a mental aspect of taking a break from half marathon training. Running is such a big part of my life, when I’m not doing so much of it, I have kind of mixed feelings. I’m enjoying having extra time in my day but I also miss my time out on the roads and trails. I’ve been running my long runs on the same trail for the past couple of years and it’s quite scenic and not crowded, so I feel a sense of peace when I’m running. Even though parts of the trail are close to neighborhoods, there are enough trees and wooded areas that you feel miles away from everything at times.

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I haven’t missed this hill from my long runs!

Until recently I didn’t really have an “off-season” from training. I’ve always taken a solid two week break from every half marathon I run, sometimes a little more if I feel like I need it, but my next race was never more than 2 or 3 months away usually. I suppose I could have ran shorter distance races this summer, but honestly the idea of running a race in the heat and humidity we have here in North Carolina doesn’t appeal to me. That could be an option for next spring during my long break between races, though. I haven’t ran a 5k by myself (I ran one with my daughter a couple of years ago) since I first started running races so it would be interesting to see how I’d do.

How about you guys? Most of the running blogs I follow make me look like a slacker when it comes to running races! Do you guys ever take an off-season from running and/or racing?

New Shoes!

And when I say new shoes, I mean NEW shoes! I did something I wouldn’t advise anyone else to do and I’ve never done it myself before. I bought a pair of running shoes online in a brand I’ve never ran in before, heck never even put on before.

For as long as I can remember, I’ve been doing my long runs in Asics Nimbus. I remember having Nimbus 9’s and now I have Nimbus 18’s so it’s been at least 10-ish years given that they increase the number each year. These have been my go-to running shoes, my never-give-me-any-problems running shoes. Even though I like to mix up my second pair of running shoes, varying brand but lately sticking to fairly flat ones, I haven’t altered my long run shoes, until now.

So what did I go with? I bought a pair of Newton Fate II’s. I’ll admit I’m a sucker for a good shoe sale, and these were on sale for $69, while the new Fate III shoes are $135 and new Nimbus 19 shoes are $160. I thought why not? If they suck, I can always return them and buy some Nimbus 19’s. Probably the bigger question is why did I switch after all these years?

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After being pretty disappointed with my last two half marathons, the one in Utah but even more so my latest one in New Jersey I decided I need to make some changes. Sure, these courses were crazy hilly, but still, I felt like I should have finished stronger than I did. While I ended up 6th in my age group for the race in Utah, I felt like the one in New Jersey wasn’t representative of what I could really do. I felt like it was time to shake things up a bit.

I decided to do a 30 day plank challenge, but this was in-between the races in Utah and New Jersey and that didn’t help me with the hills in New Jersey. Even though I used to detest squats and lunges, I started doing them to strengthen my glutes and help with Dead Butt Syndrome. I read Runner’s World ‘Train Smart Run Forever’ and was reminded of other exercises I need to be doing, besides squats and lunges, plus other things in general I need to be doing, especially as a “masters” runner. The latest thing I’ve added into the mix is to do a high intensity interval training (HIIT) workout once a week.

So back to the shoes. When I first put them on, I thought, “Wow! These really feel different!” Newton shoes have “Action/Reaction™ Technology” using five lugs across the mid foot that are supposed to provide quicker bounce back and lose less energy than traditional foam-core running shoes. I’ve never had any kind of running shoes with this kind of technology, so it was definitely new to me.

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I didn’t want to over-do it on my first run on them so I decided to just go out for a couple of miles and see how it went. The shoes felt pretty good, with plenty of room in the toe box but not too much, nice fit all-around, but they didn’t feel quite as “springy” as my previous Nimbus shoes, especially in the mid foot. This was a surprise to me, honestly, but not necessarily a bad thing. I’ve felt like I need to strengthen my feet and Achilles a bit anyway, so maybe these Newtons will help me do that.

Let’s do a little comparison of Nimbus 19 versus Newton Fate III shoes (don’t worry, I’ll keep it brief). The Nimbus 19 weighs 9.6 oz (size 8) and has a stack height of 32 mm (heel), 19 mm (forefoot). The Asics Nimbus cushioning system uses a silicone based gel and an injected top layer of lower density cushioning in women’s models. The Newton Fate III weighs 7.7 oz (size 8) and has a stack height of 27 mm (heel), 22 mm (forefoot). The Newton Fate has “Newtonium foam,” lugs as part of their action/reaction technology I mentioned before with P.O.P. 2 technology and air-filled chambers, and a biomechanical metatarsal sensor plate in the forefoot that allows you to feel the ground, for constant sensory feedback.

I think the sensor plate is why I didn’t feel like the Newtons are quite as springy as my Asics, because I definitely could feel the ground more in my new shoes, which I think is a good thing. I’m also interested to see how the difference in stack height effects my running. The Asics Nimbus difference from heel to forefoot is 13 mm but only 5 mm in the Newton, which is a considerable difference.

On my second run, I went slightly further out (about 3 miles) but ran on some trails that have some pretty steep hills. Everything seemed to feel good and I didn’t have any issues, with one minor little thing. One of the trails I ran on had some small rocks and apparently one of the rocks got wedged in-between the lugs. When I got back to a paved trail, I felt something stuck on the bottom of my shoe so I stopped to pull out the rock. Hopefully this won’t be an issue.

So far, I have high hopes for these shoes. Along with all of the other things I’ve been doing, I hope these shoes help me have a better race the next go-around in November!

Have any of you ever bought a new brand of shoes online without trying them on first?

Health Update

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A sunset during my time in Chile because, well, it’s beautiful!

For those of you that don’t recall or haven’t kept up with my blog, I woke up with tinnitus the morning of June 5. The only possible thing I can correlate it to is multiple flights from Chile two days prior (you can read about SantiagoVina del Mar and Valparaiso, and Las Cabras). I felt like my ear was full of pressure or water and I couldn’t hear as well out of my left ear. My doctor prescribed a low-dose steroid (prednisone) and referred me to an ENT specialist.

The ENT doctor prescribed a high-dose steroid, which did nothing for my ear, so he prescribed a diuretic, with the idea that there could be fluid in my middle ear, which apparently is undetectable by exam. If I thought taking high doses of steroid was difficult, it was nothing compared to the side effects of this diuretic. I was exhausted, light-headed, and just felt terrible.

After I tried to go for a bike ride, I almost passed out. I started walking my bike home for the remaining half mile, but when I started to black out, I put down my bike and just laid in someone’s front yard until I felt like I could at least walk again. The next day when I was at work, my third day of taking the diuretic, I felt like I was going to pass out when I was just sitting at my desk, so I went to the health unit and the nurse had me lie down and drink water and eat some crackers. As soon as I got back to my desk, I called my doctor and told the nurse I couldn’t continue taking the diuretic.

An MRI was scheduled as the next step, to rule out things like tumors in my middle or inner ear. Holy crap that MRI sucked! I had to lay on a flat metal gurney-type thing, not much wider than the width of my body (and I’m not a huge person!), and the technician told me to lie absolutely still for the duration of the scan, about 30-40 minutes. The worst part was when they put a metal piece, best described as a baseball pitcher’s mask or hockey goalie mask, over my face, with only a few inches of space from my face. Then they told me to keep my eyes closed for the entire time, and the gurney thing slid back into the tube, and the scan began.

If you’ve never had an MRI, one thing about them is they are LOUD! Even with ear plugs in and padding around my ears, the noises the machine made were so loud, the sound seemed to reverberate through my entire body. At times, the entire metal thing I was lying on was shaking. Half-way through the scan, the technician came out and inserted a dye into my arm, so they could have scans with and without contrast. I tasted a metallic taste in my mouth and my arm hurt where the needle was inserted. Later, I had a massive bruise there and my arm was sore for more than a week.

And then I waited for the results. Waiting for news from your doctor is always the hardest part. Not knowing has always driven me crazy. I tried not to think about it, but it was always in the back of my mind until the nurse finally called.

And…my MRI results were normal! Hooray! No tumor! The bad part, though, is we have no idea what caused the tinnitus. It could have been the flights, or maybe that was just a coincidence and I would have developed it then anyway. Since there’s no obvious cause, I’ll never know. I have a follow-up appointment with my ENT next week, but I have a feeling we’ll discuss my MRI results then he’ll tell me there’s nothing else they can do for me. There’s pretty much no treatment for tinnitus when there’s no obvious cause.

So now what? I learn to live with it. I go on. I tell myself that I’m fortunate to be as healthy as I am and I appreciate all that I do have. I start training for my next half marathon next month, so I’m glad all of this happened when I was in-between training plans.

For those of you that haven’t connected with me through Twitter or Facebook, you can find me at both of those at runningtotravel and on Instagram at runningtotraveltheworld.  I’d love to connect with you there!  Donna

Female Runners

I was appalled when I listed to a Runner’s World podcast (episode 28) about female runners called “Running While Female.”  Here is a link to the article on the Runner’s World website.  According to the article, 43 percent of women at least sometimes experience harassment on the run, from the results of a recent RW survey, compared with just 4 percent of men. Even as a female runner, I was surprised to hear just how prevalent this problem is.  I’ve been running for much of my life and somehow I have escaped the true depths of this.

As a female runner, I have been catcalled by men while out running a few times. Fortunately for me, that’s the worst I’ve ever had to encounter but that doesn’t mean I shouldn’t try to bring awareness to this problem. For many other women, they are harassed by men while running every single time they run. This is unacceptable and should be brought to an end.

When I wrote my post about running while traveling and being safe, 5 Tips How Runners Can Stay Safe and Healthy When Traveling, another blogger responded that she was almost attacked while on a run in Madrid.  Someone tried to grab her and luckily she was able to get away from him.  That’s scary stuff, though.  Women should not be yelled at, grabbed, touched, followed, or otherwise harassed when out for a run.

Running is supposed to be an escape, a time to get away from our problems, and de-stress. Women shouldn’t be stressed out about being harassed before they even get out the door or have to cut their run short after being harassed. Sadly, some women have even stopped running because of being harassed while out running.

What can we do?

Women and men both need to begin spreading the word about this.  I applaud Runner’s World for bringing attention to this.  We need to tell our husbands, boyfriends, friends, brothers, sons, co-workers, runner buddies and anyone else we can think of that this kind of behavior is not acceptable and must be stopped.  If you’re a male and are out with other males and one of them yells out something to a female runner or does something else that’s inappropriate, let them know it’s not OK to do that.

Several things were mentioned in the podcast that women can do to protect themselves while running.  These include carrying pepper spray, running with others, not running when it’s dark, altering your running route, and even getting a license to carry a small handgun.  I say do whatever makes you feel safe and whatever keeps you safe.

Harassment of women by men is a world-wide problem and goes beyond just running, but we can at least start to address this problem.  Baby steps.

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