Some of My Favorite Dog-Friendly Restaurants in Williamsburg, Virginia

I don’t really think of myself as a foodie but I can appreciate a good meal. One of the reasons I love visiting Charleston, South Carolina so much is the staggering number of excellent restaurants in the area. I don’t know if I’ve ever truly had a bad meal there in all of my many years of visiting Charleston. Charleston is well-known as a foodie town. I’ve also visited Williamsburg, Virginia many times but for some reason I didn’t really think of the area as a foodie place, that is until I recently went there.

My family and I visited Williamsburg in May and spent four nights there. Over the span of that time, pretty much every meal was outstanding. We had brought our two dogs with us and wanted to get them out of the hotel room as much as possible, so we were limited to dog-friendly restaurants with outdoor seating areas. Still, for each and every meal, we walked away feeling like it was one of the best meals we’d had in a while.

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Libby and Chile with my daughter before we went to Virginia

Here are some of my recommendations for restaurants in Williamsburg, Virginia, all of which are dog-friendly:

  1. Aromas Specialty Coffee & Gourmet Bakery. Aromas actually has three locations in Virginia:  Williamsburg, Newport News, and Swem Library. This wasn’t our first time eating at Aromas; last year we went there and the food was just as good as this time. We’ve been for breakfast, brunch, and lunch and each time the food was excellent. This time I had a chicken salad sandwich on a freshly baked croissant, my husband had a huge and very filling Cobb salad, and our daughter had a peanut butter and banana sandwich on a bagel; we all throughly enjoyed our meals. They have tables outside in the front where you can sit with your dog, or just sit outside if the weather is nice. Many people sit outside to enjoy a cup of coffee or a baked good and people watch. Aromas serves breakfast, brunch, lunch, and dinner and has a kids’ menu and even fondue and nachos in the evening.
  2. The Hounds Tale. Only open for dinner. My daughter said they should have named it The Hounds Tail (get it?). My husband and I both got the Wagyu Beef burger and it was delicious, as were the fries, which were perfectly cooked and seasoned. Our daughter got the house-made cavatelli pasta, which was also very good. The server brought us out popcorn in a dog bowl before our meals came, which our pups also enjoyed with the inevitable pieces that fell to the ground. There are only a few pub-style tables in the front the restaurant, so if you’re going to eat outside, you may want to come early to beat the crowds, especially during the busier times of year.
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The Hounds Tale
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Burger from Hound’s Tale

3. Berret’s Seafood Restaurant and Taphouse Grill. Open for lunch and dinner. Actually two separate places, we ate at the outdoor Taphouse Grill, which is open April through October. The Taphouse Grill is more casual than the historic Berret’s Seafood Restaurant across Duke of Gloucester Street. The menu features seafood, chicken and beef, highlighting Virginia specialties such as oysters, crab, and fresh produce. I had the crab cakes and they were just as good as ones I’ve had in Charleston, which is saying something. Live music is featured Tuesday through Sunday (weather permitting). Every Thursday is Flight Night. A different brewery, winery, distillery or cidery is featured each Thursday with 4 unique selections. The service was top-notch and our server even brought out a water bowl full of fresh water for our dogs.

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Crab cakes, polenta, and asparagus from Taphouse Grill

4. The Cheese Shop.Way more than just cheese, The Cheese Shop has made-to-order sandwiches, packaged sides (my husband had pickled brussels sprouts but there was also potato salad, macaroni salad, and a few others), potato chips, sodas and beer, a plethora of cheeses as you would expect, and even a wine shop in the cellar. This is one cool place. I loved just walking around looking at all of the unique foods for sale in the store and if I would have had more time, I would have liked to check out the wine downstairs. There are many tables with umbrellas in a shady spot in front of The Cheese Shop, so once you go inside and get your food, you can enjoy your food outside if you have pups with you. If you’d rather eat inside, there are also tables inside. Everything we ordered tasted very fresh with high-quality ingredients.

5. The Virginia Beer Company.  I drove by here on my way to pick up something at the grocery store one evening to take back to the hotel room and decided to check it out for dinner the next evening. Although they don’t serve food at the Virginia Beer Company, food trucks are here for dinner during the week and lunch and dinner on weekends. Check the schedule on the web page ahead of time. When we went, Capt’n Crabby food truck was there and we got the Korean BBQ chicken sandwich, Ahi Tuna Bowl, and a fresh mozzarella cheese and tomato sandwich with fresh basil. My daughter didn’t care for her cheese and tomato sandwich, but my husband and I were really happy with our choices. Our beers were also very good and there is a good selection of year-round, seasonal, and experimental IPA’s on tap.  There are picnic tables to sit at, a fire pit, corn hole, and board games so it’s a good place to hang out with friends and/or family. There is also an indoor seating area for those not bringing dogs or just want to sit inside.

I love that we were able to find so many dog-friendly restaurants in Williamsburg with truly excellent food. This is definitely a dog-friendly town so if you’re ever in the area and are fortunate enough to bring your dog(s) with you, by all means, do so!

Do you all ever travel with your dog? What are some of the most dog-friendly cities you’ve been to?

Happy travels!

Donna

How to Run With Your Dog

My dog is a better runner than I am.  I’ll admit it freely.  She has perfect form and looks beautiful when she runs.  I, on the other hand, have a grumpy right leg that causes me to look more like I’m hobbling than running half the time. If only I could run as naturally as my dog does I would surely be a better runner.

If you’re a runner and you just got a dog (or you’ve had a dog for a few years but just never ran with them) and are interested in running with your dog, where do you get started? Just pick up the leash and take your dog out for a run? Well, you could, but I don’t advise that. There are some things to keep in mind when training your dog to run with you.

To begin with, let’s take a look at your dog. If you have a tiny little pup, chances aren’t great you’ll be able to run with your dog. They just won’t be able to keep up. If you have a dog with a pushed-in snout like a pug, they most likely won’t be able to breath well enough when running since they’re prone to breathing problems anyway. Older dogs aren’t a good choice especially if they have arthritic hips, legs, or feet. If you’re unsure if your dog would be able to comfortably handle running, just ask your veterinarian. For puppies, the age range when they’re ready to go running varies by breed, so you should definitely ask your vet to be sure.

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If you have a dog that’s a good breed and age for running and you’re ready to begin, just remember to start slowly and gradually add miles. This is the same advice for any runner, really. You wouldn’t just go out and run 5 miles without any prior running experience so you shouldn’t expect your dog to do the same. Nor should you just step out your front door and start off at a fast pace.

When you head out the door, walk for a few minutes to warm up and get your dog to use the bathroom then gradually increase your pace. If your dog is having trouble keeping up, slow down and stop if necessary. It could be they just need to use the bathroom, or maybe they truly are tired and need a walk break. Go by your dog’s cues and pace for the first several times you take them out running. 10 minutes is a good start for a first-time run with your dog. If that goes well, gradually increase that amount to a distance your dog can easily handle.

Also, your dog should know some basic commands before you attempt to run with them. They should know how to walk calmly on a leash, not dragging you to every tree or squirrel in sight. If they can’t walk on a leash they’re certainly not ready to run on a leash. “Leave it” is immensely useful when walking and running with your dog, as is “wait” or “stay.” If you’re at a crosswalk waiting for a traffic light to change, “sit” can be helpful. I like to use a command to let my dog know it’s time to start running, “ready.” When I say “ready” she knows right away that’s her cue to start running.

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I like to use a 4-foot leash because I feel like I don’t have control of my dog when I use anything longer than that. Your dog should not be pulling you, just as they shouldn’t pull you when you walk them. Use a corrective command if they start to pull to make sure they’re close by your side. You also don’t want your dog to charge at someone else who walks or runs by you.

Weather is also a huge factor when running with your dog. If it’s hot and humid, you shouldn’t be running with your dog. Likewise, if it’s been snowing and the areas where you’re running have been treated with salt, it’s not a good idea to take your dog there, as the salt can hurt their feet. On the subject of feet, check your dogs feet and pads when you get home to make sure there are no cuts or other damage.

If your dog is panting more heavily than normal, starts acting lethargic, vomiting, or drooling heavily, call someone to come and pick you and your dog up and take you to a vet if necessary. Dogs can experience heatstroke and overexertion just like humans. Don’t ignore the warning signs and don’t just give your dog a ton of water hoping that will be enough. Again, like humans, dogs can also drink too much water and this can be detrimental.

Running with your dog can be a fun way to add some variety to your runs. My dog is a wonderful running partner in that she never complains about how hard it is; in fact she never complains about anything ever. She’s always happy and excited to be outside and the sheer joy she experiences when running is palpable. If only I could be more like my dog!

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How many of you run with your dog or have been considering running with your dog? What kind of dog do you have? Any and all comments are appreciated!

Happy running!

Donna