Delaware in a Weekend

I’ve lived in West Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina and I’ll admit I knew almost nothing about Delaware before I went there recently. Since I only went for a weekend, I still know almost nothing about the state but at least I can say I’ve at least seen some of the coastal areas. Other than being known as the first official state in the United States, many Americans in general don’t seem to know much about Delaware unless you happen to live in an adjoining state.

Let’s all give a little love to Delaware and learn a bit about this state. Coming in as the second-smallest state, Delaware is 96 miles long and 39 miles at it’s widest. Delaware is flat, with the highest point a mere 442 feet above sea level. There are only three counties in Delaware and some of its most popular cities include Rehoboth Beach, Wilmington, and Dover.

When I was choosing which half marathon to run for my race in Delaware (I’m running a half marathon in all 50 states), several people suggested I run a race along the coast. I thought about running the Coastal Delaware Running Festival in April with a start and finish on the Rehoboth Beach Boardwalk, but then I found the Seashore Classic Half Marathon in May in Lewes, Delaware, just outside Rehoboth Beach. The Seashore Classic Half Marathon is a much smaller affair than the Coastal Delaware Running Festival and I really like smaller, local races.

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My family and I drove up to Delaware from North Carolina and stayed in Rehoboth Beach in a house through VRBO. The house was close to everything in the area and allowed us to easily check out everything. Within an hour of Rehoboth Beach, there are a ton of things to do such as visit a couple of state parks and multiple beaches, go to an amusement park or water park, rent bikes and ride along the Junction and Breakwater Trail, or visit some historical sites in Lewes, the first city in the first state in the United States.

The afternoon of the day that I ran a half marathon, we went to Cape Henlopen State Park to walk our dogs. Part of the race was through the state park and I wanted to check out some other areas that I didn’t see on the course. We paid our $10 entrance fee ($5 for Delaware residents) and drove to the Seaside Nature Center, where we quickly found out dogs were not allowed, even though this is where we were directed to go at the entrance gate (and the woman saw and commented on our two dogs in the car).

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I asked inside the Nature Center exactly what areas of the park were dog-friendly, and was told basically everything south of there but nothing in that area or north of there. We decided to drive to the campground and parked just before the entrance to the campground. From there, we walked along parts of the Bike Loop, the Salt Marsh Spur, Walking Dunes Trail, and Gordons Pond Trail. We got turned around several times and had to use our GPS to figure out which way to go, especially on the Salt Marsh Spur, which wasn’t marked well. Overall, Cape Henlopen State Park is very scenic and a place I highly recommend going to if you’re in the area.

There is also a plethora of shopping and dining in the Rehoboth Beach area and surrounding cities. I’ve been told many people that live in nearby Maryland cross over the border to go to the outlet mall in Rehoboth Beach to save money. There are also local, unique shops with a wide range of products and services, especially in Lewes. As far as restaurants, we ate at Kindle, The Pickled Pig Pub, and Dogfish Head Brewings and Eats. My favorite was Dogfish Head, which only fortified my claim that breweries almost always have great or at least really good food.

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Cape Henlopen State Park

As I mentioned earlier, there are multiple beaches in the area, and I would venture to say the beaches are the primary reason why people come here to visit. Lewes Beach, Rehoboth Beach, Gordon Pond Beach (within Cape Henlopen State Park), and Dewey Beach are the most popular beaches as far as I can tell. Originally the plan had been to rent stand-up paddle boards from Delmarva Board Sport Adventures after the half marathon, but that wasn’t in the cards. It looks like a fun option for kayaking or paddle boarding in the area, though.

While we managed to just get a little taste of Delaware, it turned out to be a pretty state (at least what I saw along the coast) and we had a nice time there. I do have to say that it was quite congested with traffic around Rehoboth Beach on Mother’s Day weekend, so I can only imagine how much more congested it gets during the busy summer months. The area is also pretty expensive, so be prepared for that and budget accordingly.

Have you ever been to Delaware? If so, where did you go? Do you have plans to go there?

Happy travels!

Donna

 

 

 

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Seashore Classic Half Marathon, Lewes, Delaware- 45th state

This is part of a series of posts from my quest to run a half marathon in all 50 states. Delaware was my 45th state.

Since I live on the east coast, you might think Delaware is a state I would have run long ago instead of it being one of my last few races. However, I found it a bit difficult finding a half marathon in Delaware that I thought would be a good fit for me, that is, until I found the Seashore Classic Half Marathon. I prefer smallish races put on by local runners. I also prefer courses that are flat or slightly downhill. This one checked all of those boxes plus the races along the coast came recommended by other runners when I asked which race I should run for my half marathon in Delaware.

Packet pickup the evening before the race was about as quick and easy as they come for races- I went to a restaurant called Irish Eyes, told the volunteers which race I was running, picked up my bib and shirt, and was done in less than five minutes. There was no expo, no vendors, absolutely nothing other than a room with two volunteers handing out shirts and bibs, oh and print-outs of hand-drawn maps.

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Start of the Seashore Classic 1/2 Marathon

Normally I like to drive the course the day before a race so I get an idea in my head what I’m up against before a race. We tried to find the start but were unable to and it was quickly getting dark and we still hadn’t had dinner, so we decided to just get dinner and I decided to just hope for the best for the course. It was touted as being flat and fast, along the water and mostly through a state park. How hard could it be, right? That would come later.

Race morning was 65 degrees and a bit overcast, a tad warmer than I would have liked but not terrible by my standards (I tolerate the heat much better than most people). There was a 5k, half marathon relay, and half marathon, all of which started at the same time and place. Still, it was a fairly small crowd so even though maybe the first half mile or so was a bit crowded, things pretty quickly thinned out.

The first two miles of the race were on the road and my mile splits were 8:18 and 8:26, way too fast for me and I knew it. I figured I would just roll with it as long as I could, though. We entered Cape Henlopen State Park somewhere around mile 2.5 and shortly after that the ground changed from asphalt to crushed gravel. Mile 3 was 8:53, much closer to what I was aiming for.

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Part of the crushed gravel course of the Seashore Classic 1/2 Marathon

We continued on the crushed gravel path through the park, passing a lighthouse, and had several water views along the way. The turnaround point was on Gordons Pond Trail, which was also the relay handoff. I still felt pretty good at the halfway point but by mile 8, I was pretty much done mentally and physically with the crushed gravel trails. The sun was out in full force by now and there were long stretches where we were exposed to the wind, which was pretty brutal.

I did a ton of self-talk during this race and I told myself that we should be back on asphalt somewhere around mile 10. However, I was warned by a local runner that often when you go from running a long distance on crushed gravel to asphalt, it feels harder on your legs when you get back on the asphalt. Perhaps this is because the gravel isn’t quite as solid as asphalt and you have to work a bit harder to get your footing. Whatever the reason, my legs were toast by the time we reached the asphalt again.

Mile 11 was my slowest mile, at 9:46, and I was struggling to not walk (but I didn’t). All around me, people were stopping to stretch their legs briefly before continuing on. By mile 12 I was able to speed up a bit to 9:34 but my legs were so tired I couldn’t speed up that much. Finally, with the end in sight, my last mile was 9:18, and I had a respectably strong finish, with a final time of 1:58:38, good enough for second in my age group.

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2nd in my age group!

I had put it out there earlier this year that one of my goals for 2019 was to finish in the top three for my age group, Running Resolutions for 2019. I was thrilled that I was able to do that with this race because I knew it was my best chance for doing that this year. I waited around for the age group awards ceremony, not knowing where I placed in my age group, but knowing there was a slight chance I might win something based on previous years’ times.

Following the race, medals were handed out to all of the finishers at the finish line, along with bottles of water. Just a little walk from the finish line, at Irish Eyes Restaurant, there were hot dogs, hamburgers, ice cream, beer, and Bloody Mary’s. I didn’t have the stomach to eat or drink anything other than water, so I just sat and people-watched for a bit, waiting on the awards ceremony. Finally I decided a strawberry daiquiri would taste awesome (that’s normally not a drink I would ever get, either), and my husband happily went to buy one for me inside the restaurant.

My thoughts on this race are that it’s a pretty good one to run if you’re a 50-stater or live near Lewes, Delaware and want to run a scenic half marathon. If you’re the type of runner who needs crowd support, fancy aid stations, and loads of bling, this isn’t the race for you. The shirt was pretty simple, as was the medal. There were three aid stations on the course, with water only. I barely saw anyone cheering on runners except for the finish/start area.

Even though this race is often described as “fast and flat,” this isn’t an easy course by any stretch of the imagination. There are rolling hills in the park and large sections of the race where you’re exposed to the sun and wind. There’s also the toll running on crushed gravel takes on your legs. That being said, I really did enjoy this course and several times commented out loud to other runners how beautiful it was. I would recommend this race with those reservations.

Seashore Classic Half Marathon

Have any of you run a race in Delaware? If so, which one did you run and what did you think?

Happy running!

Donna

 

 

Call for Suggestions for a Half Marathon

For those of you that don’t already know, I’m running a half marathon in all 50 US states. My last one was in Utah, state number 39, which of course means I have 11 more to go. Yay!

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I have the following states to go:  New Jersey and West Virginia, both of which I’ve already got races picked out, so disregard them. That leaves Iowa, Minnesota, Arkansas, Delaware, Alaska, Wyoming, Idaho (I’m thinking one in Coeur d’Alene just because it looks amazing there), Nebraska, and New Mexico. So I ask all of you reading this, do you have any suggestions for half marathons in these states?  I’m not repeating a state, so if it’s one I’ve already done, thanks anyway.

I’ll take suggestions either way, too. If you loved or hated a race, let me know which one it was and why you loved or hated it.

Even if you haven’t personally ran a half marathon in any of these states but you have a good friend or relative who did and they raved or ranted about it, please pass those my way! I’ll take any and all suggestions I can get.

People often ask me how I choose which races I’m going to run. For many of my races, I’ve had a particular race in mind then something happens and for some reason I can’t run the race I had picked out months or even years in advance, and I’d end up running another race entirely. Usually it’s ended up well, but in the case of Tybee Island, Georgia and Run the Reagan Half Marathon, that wasn’t the best decision. Honestly, since my daughter started school, most of the races I’ve chosen have fit around her school breaks (which haven’t always been during a traditional school year).

Since I’m down to these final states it’s going to take some planning on my part to make sure I reach my goal. I don’t think I’ll be able to just randomly choose a race without thoroughly thinking the logistics through. For example, while there are some half marathons during the winter in Minnesota, you can be sure I won’t be running in any of them. That’s one state I think I have to run in the summer or early (very early) fall.

Now that I have a blog and have connected with many other runners online, I thought I’d send out a call for suggestions here. I know many of you run primarily marathons or other distances than half marathons, but I also know if you’re a part of a running community, you often hear other runners talk about races and I was hoping to gain some of that insight.

However, I realize some of these states aren’t exactly in “hot spots” where people are dying to run a race, like Disney, New York, Chicago, etc. so if I don’t get any suggestions I’ll understand. Personally, I can’t wait to go to most of these states but I don’t think they’re high on most runners’ lists of places where they want to run, with possibly the exception of Alaska.

You never know unless you ask, right? Anyone? Anything?