Lima, Peru- The Good, Bad, and the Ugly

If you fly to Peru from the United States, you pretty much have to go through Lima, although I know you can sometimes fly directly into Cusco (perhaps other cities as well, but I’m not sure). On a recent visit to Peru, we flew into and out of Lima. On the first day we arrived in the evening, took a cab to our hotel, walked around the area surrounding our hotel for a few hours, took a cab back to the airport and flew to Cusco. All was good so I’ll start there.

Our hotel was in the Miraflores section of Lima. From everything I had read before going to Peru, Miraflores is the place to be in Lima. I found a pretty nice small property in Miraflores that offered free breakfast. It was clean and the breakfast was good. We enjoyed our time walking around Miraflores, with the ocean views, stopped for lunch at a cute little restaurant that was tasty, walked around a little more, then asked our hotel to call a cab for us to the airport.

We spent almost two weeks exploring the Highlands area of Peru, including Cusco, Machu Picchu, Aquas Calientes, and Ollantaytambo, then we flew to Arequipa and explored that area before we flew back to Lima. We had an afternoon flight from Arequipa, landing in Lima around 4:30. Since our flight back home wasn’t until 1 am, we thought we could explore Lima that evening instead of staying in the airport for several hours.

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Miraflores region in Lima, Peru

I found an airport storage facility where we could store our luggage. After a few wrong turns in the airport, and being told by airport workers they had no idea what we were talking about when we asked for directions, we finally found the place. We gave them our bags, saw them whisk them away into lockers, got a receipt, and went back outside to hail a cab.

Now for the bad part of the story. We had learned from earlier experiences you must ask before you even get into the cab how much the fare would be and how long the ride would be from taxi drivers in Peru, since none of them have meters. After settling on a reasonable price with a driver who was wearing taxi credentials and being told it would take about 40-50 minutes, we were off to Miraflores. Then things started going downhill.

At first the cab ride to Miraflores was uneventful, if you consider traffic in Lima to be uneventful that is. On the best day, traffic is insane in Lima. It’s more the norm than the exception to have several near-misses with other cars and buses, and the drivers usually will speed up all of a sudden, only to slam on the brakes two minutes later, and/or jerk the car suddenly.

After maybe 10 or 15 minutes in the cab, we could see things were not going well. The driver told us the ride would take more like 2 hours to get to Miraflores (we knew that was a lie). He also told us it would take longer to go by the beach than through the city (also a lie) and he would have to pay a toll if he went by the beach (also a lie), which would cost us more money. He kept insisting that all of this was true and we would have to pay 10 soles more than we agreed to at the beginning, which we of course disputed with him.

After about a 45-50 minute ride (which we noticed he took some crazy turns simply to add on time, and even questioned him about but he blew it off like it was nothing), we could see on Google maps that we were close to where we wanted to go. I should add that he pretended to only know how to speak Spanish, but by now it was apparent he knew more English than he put on, because he laughed when my daughter made a sarcastic remark about him in English.

When we were close to getting out of the cab, he informed my husband that he didn’t have any change and required exact change only. He went so far as to pull out his wallet (a fake one, I’m sure) to show my husband that his wallet was empty. Luckily my husband had a bill small enough that the difference was only $1.50, so he threw the bill at the cab driver, saying “Take your blood money!” and we all got out, glad to be out of that car.

By this time, we were all pretty worked up and didn’t even feel like doing the shopping and walking around that we had planned. We just found a restaurant, had dinner (it was fine but nothing special and certainly not worth the cab ride), found another cab for the ride back to the airport (this guy was honest and fair and did everything he was supposed to do), picked up and paid for our luggage from the storage place, went through security, and waited for our plane.

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Surfers in Lima

And now for the ugly part of the story. Since we had a 1 am flight out of Lima, it wasn’t until we reached Atlanta several hours later that I went to pull out my cell phone from my backpack. It was missing. I thought maybe I had inadvertently stuck it in my other bag and told myself I would empty out everything at home and surely it would be there. It wasn’t. My cell phone was obviously stolen by someone at the luggage storage company at the airport. I’m positive it was in my backpack when we stored our things there and since we never check our luggage, other than storing my two bags at the Lima airport, they were with me the entire time.

I tried to find contact information for the storage company but only found an email that I’m not even sure is the same place, but I sent an email anyway, telling them my phone was missing from my backpack that was stored there. Of course I didn’t get a reply back and I don’t expect to. I called my cell phone company, explained what happened and got a new phone. As far as I can tell now, everything is OK. My phone didn’t have a locator on it, but you can be assured my next one will. It was at least password-protected and it was a piece of crap that I hated, so there is that as well.

So yes, I think Lima is a pretty awful city and would not spend any time there ever again. I loved Peru and would definitely go back again. Unfortunately you have to go through Lima airport to fly to the places I want to go back to so I’ll just plan on spending however long the layover is in the airport and not leaving. Also, I wouldn’t judge a city just by a couple of bad people, but we talked to someone in Arequipa that was from Lima. He told us Lima is a very dangerous place, filled with theft, corruption, and people are even sometimes kidnapped. No, thank you.

Have you been to Lima, Peru? What was your experience if so? Have you been to a city while you were traveling and you had a bad experience?

Happy travels!

Donna

 

 

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Author: runningtotravel

I'm a long distance runner with a goal of running a half marathon in all 50 states in the US. I also love to travel so I travel to other places when I'm not running races. Half the fun is planning where I'm going to go next!

12 thoughts on “Lima, Peru- The Good, Bad, and the Ugly”

  1. I can’t decide if I’d rather go through a taxi ride like that one or have my phone stolen….but I guess at least no one got kidnapped? Crazy! Glad things worked out and that Peru overall was a good experience!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Right- it could have been so much worse! I did think about that too, getting out of the cab. Who knows what that guy was capable of. Other than our last day in Lima, Peru far exceeded my expectations, so I will definitely be back, just not to the city of Lima!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I have never been to Lima. A brother of a friend lived there with his wife for a few months. They wanted to move there permanently (his wife is Peruvian). While they lived there, in the Miraflores section of the city, in a gated community, he was tied up, blindfolded, and robbed at gunpoint by robbers who broke into his house. Thankfully, he was unhurt. They moved back to the US and do not ever want to go back to Lima. After hearing your story, I don’t want to go there either.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Oh my goodness, this is crazy! So sorry you had to deal with all of that. Dishonest cab drivers are the worst. I’ve experienced them both I internationally and in the States. So frustrating. Sorry you ended up without a phone, but so glad you are home and safe.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Getting “played” in a foreign country is an unfortunate problem. In Costa Rica my daughter lost her passport (we’re pretty sure someone swiped it at the airport) and I fell victim to a cab driver who didn’t turn on the meter for a short drive (and charged triple what it should have been). But the positives of my trips there far outweigh the negatives, and I’d recommend Costa Rica to anyone. Just keep your eyes open and your wits about you, as you should whenever you travel!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m sorry to hear those things happened to you and your daughter in Costa Rica. My husband and I want to go back there. Nothing happened to us then but as you say, we’ll keep our eyes open because unfortunately bad things can happen anywhere.

      Like

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