Dead Butt Syndrome

I think my butt may be dying.  I don’t think it’s dead because I don’t have the extreme pain that I’ve read comes with dead butt syndrome. If you’re a runner and especially a long-distance runner, you may have heard of “dead butt syndrome” or even personally experienced it. For those of you that haven’t heard of this, I’m not making it up. It’s a real condition technically known as gluteus medius tendinosis, an inflammation of the tendons in the gluteus medius, one of three large muscles that make up the butt.

People with dead butt syndrome usually have pain in their hip(s) and poor stability around their hips and pelvis. It can occur at any age. Even non-runners can develop the condition if they have a job where they sit for long periods of time each day.

Muscle imbalance is often a culprit of dead butt syndrome. People over-compensate with their already stronger hip flexors and/or quadriceps, resulting in less use of their hamstrings and gluteal (butt) muscles, which weakens the glutes over time. Us runners without perfect biomechanics are particularly prone to this problem.

Is there hope for people with a dead butt or dying butt? Yes! You can save your dead or dying butt if you’re diligent about doing some exercises to strengthen your glutes, hips, and hamstrings. There are many exercises you can do, but some of the more recommended ones include bridge, squats, side leg lifts, and clams.

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You’ll need to do lots of squats to help dead butt syndrome!

Here is an explanation of the exercises I mentioned plus a couple more:

Bridging:  lie on your back with your eyes straight up at the ceiling and your legs bent. Pull your heels as far as you comfortably can up to your butt and raise your hips towards the ceiling. Tighten your butt when you’re as high as you can go. Slowly lower your hips back down.

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Photo credit yoga.com

Bodyweight squats:  it’s very important you have proper form for squats so use a mirror to help make sure your knees aren’t going beyond your toes as you slowly lower your butt down as if you were sitting in a chair. Have someone watch you if you’re still unsure if your form is right.

Standing on one leg:  this is a great way to fire your stabilizer muscles. Make sure you have good form and your pelvis is level. Start with aiming for 30 seconds per leg and try to increase up to one minute per leg.

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Single leg squat:  also known as a “pistol squat,” where you squat down on one leg at a time, with the other raised in front. Only do this exercise if you’ve got perfect form for bodyweight squats and this doesn’t cause pain.

Side leg lifts:  lie on your side with both legs on top of each other and lift the top leg towards the ceiling. Make sure your hips are level and your bottom leg is slightly bent.

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Clams:  lie on your side and bend both legs at a 45-degree angle. Raise your top knee up toward the ceiling, keeping your heels together and keeping your hips square.

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Photo credit keywordsuggests.com

You can incorporate these into your regular post-run stretching exercises and it should only add a few more minutes to your routine. I know, I know- more stretching! I recommend seeing a physical therapist if your pain is severe or these exercises don’t seem to help any.

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Author: runningtotravel

I'm a long distance runner with a goal of running a half marathon in all 50 states in the US. I also love to travel so I travel to other places when I'm not running races. Half the fun is planning where I'm going to go next!

14 thoughts on “Dead Butt Syndrome”

  1. I haven’t heard of it called dead butt before, but I do know that a lot of ppl have weak gluteus medius muscles! I love that you put all these helpful exercises together :)) I have seen another one in the clinic that physical therapists use to strengthen the same muscles. It uses a resistance band, and it is tied around the ankles. Then, you would do side steps while not letting the knees bend inward. Good luck with your exercise plan!

    Liked by 1 person

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